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Come On Over: 25th Anniversary


Shania Twain’s ‘Come On Over’ @ 25

Even by crossover standards, the hits-packed LP exploded country’s purview, and gave pop culture a welcome shot of femme empowerment.

By Natalie Weiner | TIDAL | November 1, 2022

Is it country

That was the question that everyone and their mother kept trying to answer on Nov. 4, 1997, when Shania Twain’s Come On Over dropped like a bomb in the middle of country radio — loud and more than a little violent in its rebukes of the genre’s much-ballyhooed conventions. 

The methods of Come On Over’s direct assault were manifold. It feels impossible to begin a piece about this album without citing its kick-in-the-pants opening: a stadium-sized seven-note riff, followed by a second, more specific invitation: “Let’s go girls,” Twain purrs, introducing another aspect of the campaign. Her brash, sexy rock riffs were explicitly directed at a female country audience, who are to this day assumed to prefer male voices, despite plenty of examples to the contrary.

After that earth-shattering four seconds, the hits just keep coming for an entire jam-packed hour, which contains a density of hooks that hasn’t been seen since. Twelve of the album’s 16 tracks saw release as singles, including three that made the Top 10 of Billboard’s Hot 100: “You’re Still the One,” “From This Moment On” and “That Don’t Impress Me Much.” Contemporary radio DJs said, repeatedly, that the only thing they could compare its volume of heavyweight pop tunes to was Michael Jackson’s Thriller — a comparison that extended to both albums’ improbably intimate production and songwriting credits.

Twain’s insistence on co-writing all of her songs with her then-husband and producer Mutt Lange was yet another rejection of Music Row’s business-as-usual, which required most songs be written in teams and then exported to the artists themselves. It also challenged the bubblegum designation that many were content to assign Twain, asserting that she was a bimbo sexpot while writing off her music as a triviality whose seductive charms could be attributed to Lange’s production.

Yet 25 years later, many of those songs endure, echoing through honky-tonks, karaoke bars, bachelorette parties, drag shows and just about every other site of over-the-top femme celebration. They’re evidence not just of the power of Twain’s effervescent ladies-night expansion on Garth Brooksian stadium country, but of how necessary her candor and self-professedly mild provocations still feel. 

Her revolution wasn’t a rhetorical one — no one, least of all Twain, would claim the album as a feminist treatise — but of style, putting relentless energy and chutzpah behind a woman’s voice, elevating her quotidian stories to a place of larger-than-life importance. They were impossible to ignore and impossible to forget, and that was exactly the point.

There were dozens of reasons why Come On Over wasn’t supposed to work, chief among them that it was like asking lightning to strike in the same place twice. Twain had already broken the sales record for a woman country artist with her sophomore album, The Woman in Me, more than doubling the previous record (held by Patsy Cline’s Greatest Hits, another dagger to country traditionalists) out of the gate. Replicating that success seemed improbable at best, especially since Twain hadn’t yet toured and there were rumblings that her talents wouldn’t hold up under the bright stage lights — or through a second massively funded and promoted record.

Her relationship with Lange furthered the assumption that she was a pretty face chosen by a powerful older male producer with an extensive hit-making résumé. It was a claim Twain was all too aware of and one she continually denied, insisting over and over again that she was just as integral a hitmaker as Lange throughout Woman in Me, which the duo wrote and produced from top to bottom when Twain was in her late 20s. “He was so interested in the fact that I was a songwriter,” she recalled to the National Post of her earliest conversations with Lange. “I just said, ‘Yeah, I am. Why? Is that important to you?’”

“He was like, ‘Is that important to me? That’s everything. I wouldn’t even want to work with an artist who wasn’t a songwriter,’” Twain added. “So I sat down with my guitar — a lot of it was done over the phone — and sang him some of the songs that I wanted to record and to work on. And he flipped. He loved it. He couldn’t believe that [these songs] had actually been passed on the first time around.”

In some ways it’s easy to understand that sexist skepticism, especially at a moment when assembly-line teenyboppers seemed to be inescapable. But the fixation on Twain’s wardrobe, how sexy she was or wasn’t, and her relationship was relentless, and shared by men and women critics alike. Men used it as an excuse to write her off (the New York Times ran a trend piece centered on Twain that cited “the unlikely symbol of the female revolution: the bellybutton”), while many self-proclaimed feminist women couldn’t resist suggesting that she was just asking for it — another battleground in the ongoing second- versus third-wave feminisms.

“I refuse to play down the way I look in order to be taken seriously as an artist,” Twain told the Los Angeles Times. “If I had an office job, I wouldn’t show up for work baring my midriff. But this is entertainment.”

Also, if every older male producer working with an attractive younger woman artist found the kind of success Lange did with Shania — if it really was some kind of cheat code for aspiring women musicians — there would be a lot more women at the top of those lists ranking the best-selling studio albums.

Instead, there’s one: Shania, with Come On Over. Their creative chemistry was remarkable, and from Woman in Me to that third album, it had evolved. “We were trying to make sure we weren’t going to get completely kicked out of town,” Twain told USA Today of Woman and its slightly more deferential attitude towards Nashville norms. “I’m not sure what’s right and wrong [in country music], but everybody talks about it all the time, and it gets you paranoid.”

Where Woman in Me toyed with glossy pop crossover, most of its songs still centered a boot-scootin’ feel and enough conventional country adornments to fit in easily among Alan Jackson and George Strait tunes. To contemporary ears, Come On Over sounds more countrified than most of what’s on the genre’s radio today — though plenty of traditionalists would argue that Shania is to blame for how broad country’s aesthetic umbrella has become.

She and Lange did throw the proverbial rulebook out of their studio’s window, compelling some of Nashville’s most iconic session players to hew to their vision. Together they sought to meld Lange’s hair-metal backbeats, Twain’s everywoman storytelling and an assortment of rock riffs and allusions that critics took delight in identifying as brazen theft. (Some noticed a bit of Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit in the Sky” in “Man! I Feel Like a Woman!” — though assigning ownership to such straightforward rock riffage is as futile as trademarking a 12-bar blues.

There was also a chartbusting pop essence, actually credited on the album as “that extra Swedish swing,” courtesy of engineer and programmer Olle Romö, whom Lange recruited just as fellow Swede Max Martin had begun to transform American pop through his work with the Backstreet Boys. It might easily have been chaos; instead it was Gold, or more specifically, Platinum — 20 times over. In the Village Voice, Joshua Clover called the album “a shot at redistricting where country can and cannot go.”

That “redistricting” is probably Twain’s most important contribution. Come On Over threw Nashville’s doors open, with Twain standing just over the threshold sticking her tongue out at anyone who might tell her she was too stupid or too sexy or too something to do whatever the hell she wanted. Nancy Sinatra’s boots were made for walking and Twain’s were made for (photogenically) stomping, insisting on her own place and voice and right to use her words in a pop song.

“It’s more frank,” she told the Star Tribune. “As opposed to, ‘How clever can we be about saying this without saying PMS?’ Let’s just say, ‘PMS.’ Because that’s the way I would say it.”

The album endures as an invitation in a genre that’s obsessed with putting up walls; its songs remain addictive confections that punch above their weight, thanks to their winking honesty. (If you wanna touch her, ask!)

Those songs’ legacy is a participatory one, rather than as static objects of veneration: Billboard recently named “Man! I Feel Like a Woman!” the best karaoke song of all time, an extension of its status as a drag show standard — a fitting path for a song with a lightly gender-bending video that offers a wonderfully apt explanation of gender as performance (anyone can “feel like a woman!”). Ascribing altruism to any pop album is foolish, but all the same, Come On Over was the best kind of fan service: unselfconscious anthems for a lot of people who sorely needed them. 

https://tidal.com/magazine/article/shania-come-on-over/1-87527



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I wonder what this means?

/download.spark?id=2516030&aBID=118191 

https://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain/status/1588209070426710023



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‘Come On Over’: Shania Twain Goes Global From This Moment On

The album made Twain a truly international star and a figurehead of female empowerment.

By Paul Sexton | uDiscover Music - UK | November 4, 2022

When a Canadian star arrived at her late 1997 album release, she knew it represented the moment of truth to turn her huge North American success into a truly global phenomenon. She was to realize that dream in the most spectacular fashion: soon after the November 5 (in Europe) appearance of Come On Over, the whole world would know Eileen Regina Edwards as Shania Twain.

The artist born in Windsor, Ontario, who grew up some 650 miles north in Timmins, had made her album debut with a self-titled 1993 set that went largely unnoticed until her breakthrough. But 1995’s The Woman In Me was a different story: quadruple platinum by the end of the year, 12 times by 2000 and, as would become Twain’s habit, crammed with more signature songs than many a greatest hits collection, from “Whose Bed Have Your Boots Been Under?” to “Any Man of Mine” and the title track to “(If You’re Not in It for Love) I’m Outta Here!”

Come On Over, again produced by Shania’s then-husband and co-writer Robert John “Mutt” Lange, was introduced in September 1997 by “Love Gets Me Every Time.” It became a country No.1 in both the US and Canada, fueled in part by a performance at the 31st annual CMA Awards. Then, alongside the album, came “Don’t Be Stupid (You Know I Love You),” which captured the essence of, yes, the woman in her: sassy, flirtatious, chatty, but definitely not to be messed with. The outline of the strong, inspirational female figurehead was being drawn in indelible ink.

On its 20th anniversary in 2017, Billboard described Come On Over as a “genre-bending album that pushed boundaries in both a musical and visual sense, with some of its music videos becoming as instantly iconic as the hits they accompanied…[it] was such a brilliant fusion of country, pop and rock that it quickly solidified Twain’s legacy, with 11 of the 16 songs hitting the top 30 on the Hot Country Songs chart (8 of which were in the Top 10, including three No. 1s).”

The album did indeed take off like a rocket in the US, with double platinum certification by Christmas. Then came the new year of 1998 and a new challenge: breaking Europe. When Twain visited London, this writer spoke to her for her first UK “broadsheet” interview, with The Times, and found her in determined mood.

“I’ll be very disappointed if I don’t get kicked off in Europe to some degree with this album,” she said, adding wisely: “But coming here, I didn’t expect people just to pick up on it and take it away. You have to earn people’s respect.”

The songwriting rules that had already served her well were plainly laid out: keep the lyrics conversational, the image approachable yet glamorous, and don’t ever be penned in by supposed genre demands. With country music still perceived as more of a specialist taste in the UK and Europe, long before it kicked down the doors to mainstream acceptance, Come On Over was released in an “international” version that turned down the twang and turned up the pop. Twain was entirely unfazed.

“Even as it is originally, the album isn’t country sounding, so the point wasn’t really to decountrify the album,” she noted. “A lot of my listeners are crossover listeners. In their CD collection there might be me, there might be Alanis Morissette, Smashing Pumpkins, Mariah Carey…so many listeners are like myself, they listen to a bit of everything.”

It took time, but new fans arrived in droves. “You’re Still The One” was released as the first international single, coinciding with its emergence as the third back home, where it went to No.2 on the Hot 100 and went on to win two Grammys. In the UK, it entered the chart in late February and climbed to No.10. Australian admirers took it all the way to No.1 there.

Come On Over entered the UK charts at a respectable No.15 for the chart week of March, but that was its only week in the Top 20, until the album grew the most extraordinarily long tail. As smash hits from the set rolled off the tongue, the game-changing one-two punch was the ballad “From This Moment On” and the feisty, girl-powerful “That Don’t Impress Me Much.” The album roared back to life in the UK, racing 29-3 in early June 1999, the first of an incredible 51 consecutive weeks in the Top 10 that included 11, in three separate runs, at No.1.

Across the Atlantic, the precious metal piled up: seven-times platinum by the end of 1998, 12-times by the close of ’99 and, dizzyingly, 20 by 2004. The Woman In Me was keeping up, too, hitting 11 million by the end of 1998. Twain practically owned Billboard’s new diamond certification for the elite ten-million club.

Back in the London interview, she explained her very deliberate approach to making Come On Over. “It happened over a very long period of time,” she said. “My intentions all along were to make a better album. I had a much better idea of what the fans so far, who had bought [The Woman In Me] were interested in and what they liked best, and it was the more progressive stuff, so I figured I should just make a more progressive album.

“So this whole album is more in your face lyrically,” Twain continued. “It’s not crude or anything like that, it’s a very optimistic woman’s point of view. It’s not an angry feminist/victim kind of point of view. There’s a lot of subject matter that I shed some comic relief on.

“Some people may think I make light of the subjects because of the way I talk about things. The whole point behind songwriting for me is to entertain people, I’m not trying to lay heavy loads on people when they’re listening. I try to make things conversational, and it’s not that easy, it’s easier to rhyme and make things sound poetic.” Twain’s country-pop poetry was conquering the world.

https://www.udiscovermusic.com/stories/shania-twain-come-on-over-album/



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Shania Twain @ShaniaTwain

25 years ago I released Come On Over... and because of your support, that album went on to become:

⭐️ The biggest-selling studio album by a female artist of all time
⭐️ The best-selling country music album ever
⭐️ The biggest-selling album by a Canadian country artist

..Crazy.

I couldn't even imagine that in my wildest dreams!! Thank you - Actually I should probably do something to celebrate it, right?? 💎

Come On Over promo - https://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain/status/1588531517550055426

10:00 AM ET - 4 Nov 22

http://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain



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"Man! I Feel Like A Woman!" has been remastered in HD.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJL4UGSbeFg

Remastered videos playlist.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJL4UGSbeFg&list=PLLDLGu9BWpzhPXbvzBFuAz3dhQHpzQDYe



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Shania Twain @ShaniaTwain

You know I had to give my iconic music videos from Come On Over the HD treatment... Man! I Feel Like A Woman! looks even more kick ass in HD!! Watch the first batch on my YouTube now and let me know what you think! 💎 https://shaniatwain.lnk.to/Remastered

"MIFLAW", "Don't Be Stupid" and "Love Gets Me Every Time" HD preview - https://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain/status/1588567830118944768

12:24 PM ET - 4 Nov 22

http://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJL4UGSbeFg



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Exclusive: Shania Twain celebrates 25 years of Come On Over and new album Queen of Me

Come On Over, the best-selling album of all time by a female artist, turns 25 today. Shania Twain speaks with GAY TIMES about the album’s unprecedented impact, her dedicated LGBTQ+ fanbase and her plans to collaborate with Lil Nas X.

By Sam Damshenas | Gay Times - UK | November 4, 2022

https://www.gaytimes.co.uk/originals/exclusive-shania-twain-celebrates-25-years-of-come-on-over-and-new-album-queen-of-me/



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25 Years of Shania Twain's Come On Over with Jeff Balding

By Sonal D'Silva | Vintage King | November 3, 2022

This November marks the 25th anniversary of Shania Twain’s Come On Over–the multiple GRAMMY Award-winning album that broke records and catapulted Twain to global superstardom. With hits like Man! I Feel Like A Woman!, You’re Still The One, and That Don’t Impress Me Much, to name a few, the album has sold more than 40 million copies worldwide and remains a fixture in pop culture even today. 

To mark the occasion we decided to go behind the scenes and talk to GRAMMY-nominated producer/mixer/engineer Jeff Balding who was the engineer on the studio sessions at The Tracking Room in Nashville where a majority of the album was recorded.

Jeff gives us an in-depth look at the mics and outboard gear used during the sessions, shares his process of sculpting the sound while tracking, and tells us what stood out for him from his experience of working with producer Robert John “Mutt” Lange in the studio.

Let’s start with how you got involved in the project.

I had been working with Mutt on some other projects–he'd been working a lot in Nashville–so this was the next project he called me for. 

What was a typical day in the studio for you while working on the album?

What was unique and great about this project was we spent one day tracking per song. Most days it seemed like we focused on the intro and verse until lunch, working out intricacies and licks; then we’d pick up, working out parts in the rest of the song throughout the afternoon, getting final takes in the evening and then work into the night, refining and fixing some of the parts. They were long and intense days but the end product was always amazing.

The majority of the album was recorded at Masterfonics – The Tracking Room in Nashville­­. How did the space shape the sound?

The Tracking Room had several recording spaces or booths and each had a different character to it. The room with the most character was the “stone room” which had stone walls and a stone floor. This is where I put the drums; this room had a lot of energy for drums. One thing that had influenced putting the drums in the stone room was that Mutt had stopped by The Tracking Room when I was working on another project. I had the drums on a riser in the stone room and he loved that idea, so we put the drums on a riser in the stone room for Shania’s project. The stone room had a big influence on the drum sound.

For the other instruments, the musicians were spread out in the other booths and rooms in the studio allowing them to play together as a band but retain separation. Part of the charm of making a record here is cutting all the musicians at the same time–great musicians feeding off of each other and taking a song to the next level. The drums, bass, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, steel and keyboards were all cut together at the same time.

You can really feel the energy of the band on the record.

That’s everything coming together the way it should: production, musicians, sonics and songs, and attention to detail to make sure that energy is captured. Mutt knew exactly what he wanted–even down to how the guitar player would strike the strings. He was very specific with everything in the production process, even pointing out specific frequencies to address in the EQ of the instruments, if needed. There was no stone left unturned–even before we started tracking we spent at least a day listening to snare drums and kick drums, and getting sounds.

So that is a true story? I had heard that was a part of the process on this record.

Yeah, we spent a lot of time picking out the three snares that were used on the record. I don't remember which ones they were, Paul Leim would remember that, but the ones that were chosen had the sound we all were looking for.

A lot of time was spent trying different micing placements and making sure I captured everything exactly how it needed to be; a lot of time was spent on the sonic detail of the record in the tracking sessions. It was amazing how tight the tracks ended up being, which really opened up the sonic landscape of the record in an amazing way. There was a lot of time and attention spent on every detail.

Let’s discuss some of the mics that were used on the album.

We listened to a few mics on the kick and ended up using an Audio Technica ATM25–one of the original ones–as the “inside mic” and a combination of a Neumann U47 FET and an NS-10 woofer for the “outside” kick sound; a Shure SM57 on the snare top and a Neumann KM 84 for bottom snare; U47 FETs on the toms and the Neumann KM 84 on the hi-hat. The overheads were AKG C12s and I used U67s and U87s for room mics–one pair in front and one pair in the rear behind the kit.

On the guitars, it was a 57 and a Royer R-121, and the piano I believe was the AKG 414. For the acoustic guitar, we used a KM 84 and on gut string we used a Sanken CU-41. And for Shania's vocal, we used a Manley Reference Cardioid mic.

In terms of outboard gear, what pieces were invaluable during the recording sessions?

Neve 1073s and 1081s were definitely used a lot on drums, bass and guitar; API pres were used on some things; the studio’s SSL console was used for some of the instruments as well. In addition to that, Urei 1176, Urei 1178, a Fairchild 670, and the Neve 33609–among other classic staples–were used on various instruments.

The fiddle overdubs were done at The Tracking Room after the tracking dates–six fiddle players around a pair of AKG C12s. The unique thing about this–besides six fiddle players playing the same part at the same time–was that the musicians would play the fiddle hook over and over throughout the entire song giving the option to choose the best-feeling hook to fly into the sections that needed it.

You’ve said before that when you're tracking you like to sculpt the sound as you're going along. Could you elaborate on that?

I think it’s important to sculpt a sonic picture for a song. Each song varies so the sonic picture needs to connect with the song. That would involve EQ, compression and mic changes if needed–the focus is always the song. The great thing in tracking is you're interacting with the musicians and they're interacting with the sounds as you're changing them and that then influences how they’re playing. For instance, if you're adding extra compression to an electric guitar, the guitar player is going to adjust how he plays so that the compression complements the part they're playing and it all contributes to the final product. That's the best thing about tracking with everybody in the room, everybody reacts to each other and to the sounds.

In 1996-1997, what was considered cutting-edge technology that went into the making of the record?

We'd been through the transition of the Mitsubishi 32-track with the Apogee Mods, but then the Sony 3348 came along and sounded way better and everybody gravitated to that–obviously for the track count. That’s what the basic tracks were cut on.

Could you give us some examples of analog and digital components that contributed to the record during tracking?

It was all recorded through analog signal paths going straight into the Sony 3348– mainly Neve and API preamps, although the console pres were used on some things. Then everything went straight to the 3348.

I remember when the album came out, a lot of us listened to it on very basic consumer headphones which were really bad quality compared to what we have now but none of that mattered–the album was just so much fun to listen to.

The writing and production was definitely fun. Sometimes we forget that music should be engaging and entertaining to listen to.

In several interviews, Shania has said that her intention with this record was to expand her audience and cross over into pop–how did that translate into any technical decisions that were made during recording?

I’ve always worked in different genres so I like to incorporate sonic elements from other genres into whatever I’m doing. I think that helps keep things fresh and a little more unique. One example on this album was using a riser for the drums and using a Clear Vistalite kick drum–the same setup I used on a Megadeth record a few months before.

For you, as an engineer, were there any challenges during the recording process that are now memorable?

I don’t remember any specific challenges other than just making sure the sounds were where they needed to be...

What stood out for you about working with Mutt Lange and Shania Twain?

Both of them were very focused; they knew exactly what they wanted and they knew how to get there–how to lead everyone to that place. That’s a gift–to be able to bring musicians along and keep everybody motivated, especially when you spend that much time on a song. So to be able to keep everybody motivated, keep them moving in a direction, and to have clarity about where they're going is a great quality. 

There was a lot of refining as we went along. There was a focus on the details but it was also about feeling the song and getting the emotion out of it–you felt it as parts would get refined. Mutt would make slight changes and ten minutes later you would go, “Oh, that made a big difference!” You kept feeling more emotion and getting more out of the track and I just remember them both being very attuned to making sure that stayed in the music.

What do you think of most when you look back at your time working on this album that has gone on to be much loved by people from all over the world?

A lot of good memories! The great blend of personalities and musicianship stands out the most to me. I’m still amazed to be part of such a great project. 

https://vintageking.com/blog/2022/11/shania-twain-come-on-over/



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Tommy wrote:

Shania Twain @shaniatwain

#duet with @RealHypha #shaniatwain Okay... this does impress me much 😂 This remix is KICK ASS!! #letsgogirls Shania Twain Real Hypha Remix - Real Hypha

Listening to a fan's remix of "Man! I Feel Like A Woman!" - https://www.tiktok.com/@shaniatwain/video/7151129355677191429

4:35 PM ET - 5 Oct 22

http://tiktok.com/@shaniatwain

Twitter - https://twitter.com/MuzikGuy94/status/1578095975851503617

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XS4QtN7OOws

FULL VERSION

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8J2CBwQlNv8


Shania has released "Man! I Feel Like A Woman!" (Real Hypha Remix) on her YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_KTsbUjEP0



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Shania Twain @ShaniaTwain

It’s not easy to work out new platforms at this stage in my career. But TikTok is a space I think is so fun! This remix was created by someone and you guys organically started using it in your TikToks (and beyond!), so let’s hear it for Real Hypha's remix! shaniatwain.lnk.to/miflawrealhypharemix

4:42 PM ET - 16 Nov 22

http://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_KTsbUjEP0



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Shania Twain @ShaniaTwain

You're Still The One, From This Moment On and When are the next collection of my music videos to receive the HD treatment... Just gorgeous! 😍 Watch on my YouTube now and let me know what you think! 💎 https://shaniatwain.lnk.to/Remastered

"You're Still The One", "When" and "From This Moment On" HD preview - https://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain/status/1593666493933178880

1:04 PM ET - 18 Nov 22

http://twitter.com/ShaniaTwain



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